Yaril Quintana's 1950 Ford

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Yaril's Ford the day it arrived at Yaril's Customs. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
A 283 small block V-8 from a 1961 Chevrolet Nomad was chosen for the build. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The build was started in July 2010. The first thing Yaril did was to lift the body off the frame. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The floors were bad, so Yaril cut them out so he could start fresh instead. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The frame was already notched in the rear when Yaril bought it, but after tearing out the floors, he decided to channel the body over the frame so he could allow more suspension and at the same time maintain a nice tail dragging stance. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
On this photo the front area of the frame has been cleaned up and sprayed in black. The body is sitting where Yaril wanted it on the frame, and it is a roller again. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The rear fenders were modified to accept the taillights lenses from Yaril's 1951 Buick, his previous full custom build. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The frenched in Buick taillight compared to the stock taillight. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
After new housings were made for the taillights, Yaril shaved the deck lid and molded the rear splash pan to the body. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The factory fender seams were removed from the top of the fenders and molded in. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The firewall was cleaned up for a smoother appearance. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Most of the holes in the dash were filled in. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
By the end of July 2010 the rear of the car was almost done and ready for bodywork. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
A 1953 Kaiser bumper guard was modified and installed on the rear bumper. The exhaust was routed through the bullets on the bumper. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The bullets on the bumperguard were welded to the top bar. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Two 6" long 3" outside diameter thick wall pipes were fit inside the bullets. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The bumpers were cut using a torch to allow the new pipes to slip in. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The new floor coming together. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
By mid August Yaril had cut the roof off the shoebox. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
In this photo Yaril has taped out 4" to be removed from the roof pillars. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
After the a-pillars were cut, Yaril filled the wipers and washer holes. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The rear package tray was cut out and moved forward 7 inches. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Yaril bought a couple convertible doors to use with the build. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The convertible doors had a downward dip that prevented them from closing, so Yaril had to dolly the bottoms up to make them fit. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
This photo shows the difference between the convertible doors and the stock door opening. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
New floors installed in the trunk. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
A K-member was fabricated to strengthen the chassis after the roof came off. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
By the end of September the body was back on the frame. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The firewall cleaned up and prepped for paint. As Yaril wanted to weld the fenders to the body he wanted to paint the firewall before installing the fenders. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The fenders were welded to the body, and the front splash pan was welded to the fenders. In this photo the hood has been mocked on for an overlook of the car. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Yaril made a cardboard template of the door and rear quarter glass to visualize the window openings. When it came to the padded top, he wanted to use the style of the Gaylord tops as inspiration as he felt they flowed better then the Carson Tops on a 1950s car. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
When it was time to start on the top, channels were bent after the cardboard template. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
1/2" electrical conduit was used as cross bows for the top. This photo shows how Yaril had to rework the quarter panel to fit the convertible door as well. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
White paper was used over the conduit to visualize the shape of the top. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
A profile view of the top. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The headlights were frenched by welding the stock stainless headlight rims to the fenders. The headlight buckets were mounted from the inside of the fender by flipping the J-clips. This photo shows how Yaril has mocked up two 1951 Kaiser bars inside the grille opening as well. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
After studying and comparing the top with the top on Don Carroll's 1949 Ford, Yaril decided to lower the rear bow a tad for better flow. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Once again, using Don Carroll's 1949 Ford as reference, 1-1/2" pipes were bent to contour the sides of the new grille opening. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The hood had to be extended downward in order to stay level with the floating grille bars. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Yaril decided to lift the body off the frame one last time so he could install the engine and transmission without risking a scratch. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
By the 4th of November 2010, Leo had covered the body in primer. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The old white walls were removed and replaced by a brand new set of Firestone 6.70-15 whitewall tires. The stock steelies were sanded down, epoxied and painted to match the color of the car. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Before the body was put back on the frame Leo sprayed a reddish guide coat over the primer. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
November 6, 2011 the body was back on the frame again, and Yaril had began mocking up the car so he could display it at a local show. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The dash and inner fenderwells painted and ready for assembly. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The rear end mocked up. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
After consulting Paul Bragg, Yaril decided to rework the top a little in order to achieve a better flow. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The top was shaped with construction mesh in order to prevent the padding from sagging. The rear corners were made in steel from the old roof. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
New wiring from Rebel Wiring installed along with insulation and the filled and painted dash. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The center floating bar support was fabricated out of electrical conduit. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
A bench out of a 1971 Chevrolet was stripped down and modified to fit the car before it was upholstered in white and maroon rolls and pleats. The maroon color is an exact match of the color Yaril has planned for the car. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Yaril made it to the Turkey Run in Daytona, and drove around all weekend without the hood. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
From Daytona, the shoebox was trailered directly to Leo for final preparations. After blocking the car out a countless number of times, the last coat of yellow primer was laid on the car the December 31, 2010. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
A coat of black epoxy primer was used as final sealer before paint. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The base coat sprayed onto the car. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Two layers of base coat were followed by six coats of clear for a deep effect. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
January 7, 2011, Yaril's shoebox was ready for wet sanding and final assembly. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Two friends helped Yaril wet sand and buff the car before assembly. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Matching maroon carpets with white outlining installed. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Yaril's shoebox at the upholstery shop a couple of hours before he hit the road. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
About 4 hours after Yaril picked the car up at the upholstery shop he loaded it up, picked up his friend Leo and hit the road to California. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Yaril and Leo after they arrived in on Thursday, waiting in line to get the shoebox into the Suede Palace. Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
The Cadilac Sombreros were installed on to the car outside the show on Thursday. Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Miss Beloved during set-up day at the Grand National Roadster Show. Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Yaril won a total of 7 awards at the Suede Palace with Miss Beloved. Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Photo by Sondre Kvipt.
Miss Loved arriving in New Mexico on the way back to Florida. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
In Texas Yaril got surprised by snow and cold weather. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
After 6,000 miles on the road, Yaril and Miss Loved were back in Florida. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Yaril returned to Florida with the back seat filled with trophies. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
In July, 2011, Yaril tore the car apart sanding it down. His mission was to spot some areas that got "road wear" going back and forth to California, and making it ready for another road trip to Kansas for the KKOA show. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
The body was sanded in 500, followed by 600 wet. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Tennessee welcomes Yaril and his cross country custom on the way to Kansas. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
In May of 2015 Yaril sold the shoebox to Billy F. Gibbons of ZZ Top. This photo shows Jeff Beck, Billy F. Gibbons and Yaril cruising the Ford. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Jeff Beck, Yaril and Billy F. Gibbons next to the shoebox. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.
Miss Beloved parked next to Billy F. Gibbons RV backstage at a show. Photo courtesy of Yaril's Customs.

1950 Ford Convertible owned and restyled by Yaril Quintana of Yaril's Customs in Hialeah, Florida. Also known as "Miss Loved", Yaril based his convertible build on a beaten up two-door sedan that he bought in 2009. The build was started in July 2010, and Yaril's intentions were to build a car he could enjoy for a while and then sell off to get some money to build up his shop. He began it all by lifting the body off the frame. The floors in the car was in a bad condition, so Yaril cut them all out so he could start fresh instead. The frame was already notched in the rear by the previous owner when Yaril got the car. After tearing out the floors he decided to channel the body over the frame as well. As he didn't want to loose too much cabin space, the firewall was kept stock while the trunk body mounts were raised about 3 or 4 inches. A Chevrolet S-10 rear end was hung in the notched frame. As the S-10 rear end is about 2" shorter than the stock axle, Yaril decided to use 1" spacers with the axle. A K-member was fabricated to add strength to the chassis after the roof came off. A 283 small block Chevy engine out of a 1961 Chevrolet Nomad was installed in the car. The engine had supposedly 84 000 original miles to it and was hooked to a rebuilt 700R4 transmission from a Corvette. Both the engine and transmission were painted in the same Maroon color that Yaril had planned to use on the exterior of the car.[1]


When it comes to body modifications, Yaril wanted to use the taillights he shaved of his 1951 Buick, so the taillight-housings were modified to accept these lenses. After frenching in the taillights, Yaril shaved the deck lid and molded the rear splash pan to the body. The factory fender seams on the top of the fenders were removed and molded in for a cleaner appearance, and the gas door on the fender was filled in. Yaril kept the stock rear bumper, but he shaved it for bolts and welded up the holes before he sent it off to the chrome shop. A 1953 Kaiser rear bumperguard was modified to fit the the shaved rear bumper. The bullets on the bumper guard were welded to the top bar and the tips were cut out so the exhaust could exit through the bullets. August 14, 2010, after restyling the rear end and fabricating a new floor for the car, Yaril cut the roof off the old Shoebox. After the top came off, Yaril whacked 4" out of the A-pillars. During the chop the wipers and washer holes were filled. The rear package tray was cut out and moved forward 7 inches, and a couple of 1949 Ford convertible doors were purchased for the car. The convertible doors had a downward dip that prevented them from closing, so Yaril had to dolly the bottoms up to make them fit. While he was at it working on the doors, he shaved the door handles, filled in the key holes and rounded the bottom corners as well.[1]


Up front, the fenders were welded to the body, and the front splash pan was welded to the fenders. The headlights were frenched by welding the stock stainless headlight rims to the fenders. The headlight buckets were mounted from the inside of the fender by flipping the J-clips. A new grille opening was made out of 1-1/2" pipes. Using Don Carroll's 1949 Ford as reference, the pipes were bent to nicely follow the contours of the side fenders. In order to keep the top tube level with the floating 1951 Kaiser bars he planned to use, the hood had to be filled and extended downward towards the tube. The hood corners were rounded, and the stock front bumper was simplified by shaving the nuts and guards before sending it off to the chrome shop. A Gaylord inspired padded top was scratch-built from channels and 1/2" electrical conduit. The top was shaped with construction mesh in order to prevent the padding from sagging before it was sent away to the upholstery shop. Inside, the dashboard was shaved for radios and buttons, and painted in the same color as the rest of the car.[1]


After completing the new grille opening and the framework for the top, Yaril lifted the body off the frame for the last time so he could install the newly painted engine and transmission without scratching anything. November 4th, 2010, Yaril's friend Leo Vizcaino had primered the body so Yaril could start on the block sanding and final bodywork. By then, Yaril's short term goal was to get the car ready for a test drive to the Turkey Rod Run in Daytona about a month later....his overall goal was to take it to the Grand National Roadster Show in California 2 months later. The old whitewall tires were removed and replaced by a set of brand new Firestone 6.70-15 whitewall tires. The rims were sanded, epoxied and painted in the same color as Yaril had planned for the car. After about 4 months of hard work Yaril reached his short term goal, but as the car had only 2 miles logged on it he decided to trailer it to the Turkey Rod Run in Daytona. He drove it around Daytona all weekend without a hood and with the top covered in construction mesh. Driving it around Daytona he was able to tweak and adjust the car properly.[1]


Back from Daytona, Yaril took the car straight to his painter Leo's house. After countless coats of primer had been laid and blocked out, the final coat of yellow primer was laid on the car the 31st of December, 2010. A coat of black epoxy primer was used as final sealer before a few coats of the maroon base were sprayed onto the car. The color for the car was mixed based upon the maroon leather Yaril had chosen for the interior. A swab of the maroon leather was clear coated and scanned by the painter. By doing this a perfect match could be mixed for the car's paint. The base coats were followed by two coats of clear. These were sanded down and followed by two additional coats of clear. After sanding and cleaning these coats the last two coats were sprayed onto the car. These layers were wet sanded and buffed to perfection before final assembly could begin. As Yaril was planning a trip to California in less then a month, time was not on his side. The top and entire interior, minus the front seat ,needed to be done before he could hit the road. With good help from friends, the car was assembled in Yaril's backyard. From there it went straight to Rivero Upholstery for the final touch. At the upholstery shop they discovered that the material for the padded top was not bright white, but a bit tan. The correct material was ordered for overnight shipping on Thursday. As the credit card didn't go through the first time, the shipping was delayed one day, arriving on Saturday instead of Friday. The top was luckily done by Monday, and about 4 hours after it was finished Yaril hit the road with the newly completed car, heading for California and the Grand National Roadster Show. By that time Yaril had logged a total of 40 miles on the car. In order to make it in time for the show, Yaril and his co driver Leo took turns driving 200 mile intervals while the other napped. After 2,700 miles on the road, Yaril and Leo arrived in Ontario, California around 10 am Thursday. The travelers had just enough time to wash the car, grab a bite to eat and take a shower before they had to head for the show. While waiting in line to get in to the show, Yaril completed the build by installing a brand new set of 1948 - 1952 Cadillac Sombreros on the car. Miss Loved was displayed at the Suede Palace part of the show, and during the award ceremony on Saturday, Yaril won seven awards with his long distance tail dragging custom. After hanging around in California for about a week after the show, he hit the road again, and drove Miss Loved across the country to Florida. When he returned back home he had put 6,000 miles on the car since it was completed.[1]


Later on, in July 2011, Yaril tore the car apart again, sanding it down. His mission was to spot some areas that got "road wear" going back and forth to California, and make it ready for another road trip to Kansas and the KKOA Leadsled Spectacular. Needless to say, Yaril made it back and forth with his "cross country custom".[1]


In November 2011, Yaril advertised the car for sale on eBay. By then he had put 12,000 miles on it since it was completed in January 2011.[2]


In May of 2015 Yaril sold the Ford to Billy F. Gibbons of ZZ Top.[3]


Magazine Features

Kustoms Illustrated 31
Car Kulture Deluxe 53
Rod & Kulture 30

References



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