The Juxtapod

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Juxtapod-1928-ford-model-aa29.jpg
An early concept sketch of the Juxtapod. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The Juxtapod as it sat in June of 2010. In this photo the dropped and drilled front axle has been attached to the stock model A frame. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The front end mocked up with freshly made hairpins in place. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The freshly kicked up and boxed frame mocked up on wheels with the 348 Chevrolet V-8 engine and transmission for the first time. This photo was taken late in July 2010. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The top was chopped 7.5". Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The dashboard is a narrowed down and altered 1960 - 1963 Chevrolet truck dashboard. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
A brand new bed was bought for the project. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
LeBeef with one of the brackets he made for the ladder bars. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The ladder bars and transmission crossmember installed. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The Juxtapod as it sat in October 2010. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The body was channeled 4" over the frame. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The firewall had to be altered in order to accept the huge V8 engine. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The chromed metal structure for the crystal gas tank, fabricated by LeBeef. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
One of the crystal velocity stacks that Ludvig made for the Juxtapod. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The crystal gas tank coming together. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The centre console was made from scratch to match the altered dashboard. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
A 1950 Ford gauge was integrated into the dashboard. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The new grille insert coming together. This photo was taken before it was sent to the chrome shop. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The Juxtapod as it looked in December of 2010, 3 months prior to its first showing at the Röhsska art museum. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
A detail shot of one of the crystal ornaments that are going into the grille-insert. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
1940s Buick taillights were integrated into the rolled pan below the tailgate. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The wooden roof-structure installed. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
January 19, 2011 the Juxtapod was displayed at Automässan auto trade fair in Göteborg. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
LeBeef and Ludvig with their in-progress art project. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Ludvig working on the design for the inner mirror-roof. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The frame finished up and painted white. Conny Löf at Blästerteknik in Ödeborg prepared and painted the frame. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Blaster finishing up the bodywork on the cab before paint. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Chromed parts back from Göteborgs Förnicklingsindustri, waiting for final assembly. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The etched mirror for the inner-roof. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The cab with its base color sprayed on. The shape of the panels are also partly masked up in this photo taken March 18, 2011. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
March 22, 2011, the newly painted body is loaded up and ready to be sent back to LeBeef for final assembly. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The fuel-lines for the six-carb setup. Another scratch-built LeBeef detail on this build. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
This photo is taken March 27, 2011, two days before the official showing at the Röhsska art museum in Göteborg. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
March 29, 2011, after working day and night LeBeef and his crew got the Juxtapod done in time for the showing at Röhsska art museum. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The Juxtapod at Växjö Art Museum. Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
Photo courtesy of the Juxtapod Blog.[1]
The Juxtapod at the 2011 X-treme Car Show in Helsinki, Finland. Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.
Photo courtesy of Sondre Kvipt - Kustomrama.


The Juxtapod is a 1928 Ford Model AA Truck built by Mattias Andersson of LeBeef Kustom Metal Works for Johan Belin and Ludvig Löfgren of Sweden. Built in a 1960s show rod style, the truck is a rolling art project incorporating Swedish state of the art crystal design by Ludvig Löfgren. The idea for the name "Juxtapod" came from Juxtapoz, an underground art magazine started by Robert Williams.[1]


The body for The Juxtapod sat in LeBeef's shop for some years before the project started. He sold it to Johan and Ludvig, and the project was started in February of 2010. Mattias "LeBeef" Andersson began the build by reworking the frame. The frame was boxed and kicked up 10" in the rear. Up front it was lowered by installing a 4" dropped axle. The hairpins were custom fabricated by Karl Hammarsträng. A 1955 Oldsmobile rear-axle was installed in the rear. The axle was hung up using custom made ladder bars. The body was chopped 7.5" and channeled an additional 4" over the frame. A chopped 1932 Ford grille shell was installed up front. The grille shell was fit with a custom made chrome insert fit with crystal spikes hand made by Ludvig. A brand new full size bed was bought in pieces, assembled and installed on the truck. A custom made pan fit with 1940s Buick taillights was installed in the rear. Power comes from a 1958 Chevrolet 348 cid engine that was dressed up with an 6x2 Offenhauser intake, 6 Stromberg 48 carburetors, crystal velocity stacks, chromed stock valve covers and a chromed alternator. Several other parts on the engine and front suspension were also chromed. The engine was hooked to a TH350 Chevrolet automatic transmission. A new electrical system was made and installed by M&M Autowiring. The system was based on their "Easy Rewiring Hotrod Kit". Inside, the Juxtapod received a custom made dashboard fabricated from a 1960 - 1963 Chevrolet truck dashboard. A centre console was built from scratch to match the dashboard. A 1950 Ford gauge was incorporated in the console. The steering wheel was custom made in steel and crystal and the upholstery was done in white leather and angel hair. Once the bodywork was done, the cab, truck and bed were sent to Blaster for final preparations and a panel paint job. The frame was finished up and painted white by Conny Löf at Blästerteknik in Ödeborg. A custom gas tank made from crystal and chrome was installed on the newly painted bed. The gas tank incorporated the original filler port, but with a cystal addition. The Juxtapod was then fit with a set of Radir Tri-Rib rims fit with Firestone 5.60-15 and 7.10-15 wide whitewall bias-ply tires.[1]


After a year of hard work, the Juxtapod made its debut March 29, 2011 at the Röhsska art museum in Göteborg. After being displayed at the Röhsska art mueum for two months, the Juxtapod was moved to Växjö Art Museum July 20, 2011 for another two months display there. At Växjö Konsthall the Juxtapod was shown in an exhibition featuring some of Ludvig's work. September 24 and 35 the Juxtapod was shown at the 2011 X-treme Car Show in Helsinki, Finland. At the show, the truck won four awards: Best Hot Rod, second in Peoplec Choice, The John D'Agostino Hot Rod Award and the Sabina Kelley Choice.[1]


References



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