Ray Furgal and Ron Seaver's 1941 Ford

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1941 Ford convertible owned and restyled by Ray Furgal and Ron Seaver. Ray and Ron were stationed in Tokyo, Japan when they built the car. Photo courtesy of Car Craft Magazine.
In 1955 a letter from Ray and Ron, describing the build, was published in the January issue of Car Craft magazine. According to the letter, the car was a complete wreck when they bought it. The duo restored it and customized it after their own likings, and they wanted the letter to inspire other custom car enthusiasts stationed overseas.
All chrome was shaved from the body, and the front fenders were modified by welding them together as a one-piece unit. The light brackets were then reversed before the headlights were frenched. A handmade one-piece front end was welded on. Holes were then cut for the grilles, which also were handmade and chromed. Photo courtesy of Car Craft Magazine.
In the back of the car, a section was added to the rear fenders. It was dressed up with homemade fenderskirts which were 9 inches in width. The gas filler door was then removed from the fender and relocated to the trunk of the car. A hydraulic lift operated the shaved trunk. Tailights, with directional lights, were mounted on the bumper. Photo courtesy of Car Craft Magazine.

1941 Ford convertible owned and restyled by Ray Furgal and Ron Seaver. Ray and Ron were stationed in Tokyo, Japan when they built the car.[1]

Tokyo Custom

In 1955 a letter from Ray and Ron, describing the build, was published in the January issue of Car Craft magazine. According to the letter, the car was a complete wreck when they bought it. The duo restored it and customized it after their own likings, and they wanted the letter to inspire other custom car enthusiasts stationed overseas.[1]


Hopped Up

Ray and Ron had less than $700 tied up in the car, including what they paid for it. The car was completely dismantled when they got it, so they started by reworking the engine. The heads were milled and headers and a dual intake manifold were installed.[1]


Molded In

All chrome was shaved from the body, and the front fenders were modified by welding them together as a one-piece unit. The light brackets were then reversed before the headlights were frenched. A handmade one-piece front end was welded on. Holes were then cut for the grilles, which also were handmade and chromed.[1]


Rear End Modifications

In the back of the car, a section was added to the rear fenders. It was dressed up with homemade fenderskirts which were 9 inches in width. The gas filler door was then removed from the fender and relocated to the trunk of the car. A hydraulic lift operated the shaved trunk. Tailights, with directional lights, were mounted on the bumper. Parking lights were placed inside the front grille.[1]


Jaguar

A new black top, with a Jaguar window frame in the curtain was installed, and the center bow on the top was cut two and a half inches. The seats were completely rebuilt, and the seats, door panels, and kick-boards were upholstered in red and white three-inch pleated leather.[1]


"Burple"

The build was completed with nine coats of hand rubbed "Burple," a color made from a mixture of metallic blue and purple. The paint was the feature of the car that Ray and Ron was proudest of. The bottom part of the dashboard was chromed, while the upper part was sprayed with "Burple."[1]


Magazine Features and Appearances

Car Craft January 1955


References



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