Dick Noble's 1932 Ford

From Kustomrama
Revision as of 08:12, 19 August 2019 by Admin (talk | contribs)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
After swapping bodies with a fellow employee at Adel Aircraft, Dick worked on the car, preparing it for paint. "Disaster struck, in the form of a young lade with a new Packard running a stop sign, hitting dad, spinning him around, damaging both front and rear fenders. The police came and sided with the young lady, letting her off with no reimbursement for dad. The police kinda had it out for young hot rodders in those days." This photo was taken after the accident, "and you can see that he is not happy," Dick's son, Richard "Nobey" Noble told Sondre Kvipt of Kustomrama in 2019. Photo courtesy of Dick Noble, from The Richard "Nobey" Noble Photo Collection.
After the accident, Dick redid the metalwork and painted the roadster black. "The top was already finished by an old Swedish gentleman who was a top-notch upholsterer in Burbank. The top was padded and had side curtains. The price was $225.00 in 1941, but dad was very happy with his work." Photo courtesy of Dick Noble, from The Richard "Nobey" Noble Photo Collection.
A photo of Dick with the car during a trip to Yosemite. "You can see Yosemite Falls in the background. Two other roadsters from Burbank went with him on the trip." Photo courtesy of Dick Noble, from The Richard "Nobey" Noble Photo Collection.

1932 Ford Roadster owned by Dick Noble of Burbank, California.

In 2019 Dick's son, Richard "Nobey" Noble, told Sondre Kvipt of Kustomrama that his dad bought the car in 1938; "It started life as a three-window coupe that dad paid $115.00 dollars + 2.00 transfer fee for." Dick was working for Adel Aircraft in Burbank, and a fellow employee had a 32 Ford roadster. "He wanted a 32 coupe. Dad wanted a roadster, so a deal was struck." The two men would trade bodies, so after four hours of work, they each had the bodies they wanted.[1]


The Crash

After swapping bodies, Dick worked on the car, preparing it for paint. "Disaster struck, in the form of a young lady with a new Packard running a stop sign, hitting dad, spinning him around, damaging both front and rear fenders. The police came and sided with the young lady, letting her off with no reimbursement for dad. The police kinda had it out for young hot rodders in those days."[1]


Better Days Ahead

Better days were ahead, and Dick redid the metalwork and painted the roadster black. "The top was already finished by an old Swedish gentleman who was a top-notch upholsterer in Burbank. The top was padded and had side curtains. The price was $225.00 in 1941, but dad was very happy with his work."[1]


One of Burbank's Finest

Dick ran both a stock headlight bar and a dropped bar with 1933 Chevrolet headlights. "He ran the ripple with flippers hubcaps. Under the hood sat a 1934 Ford mill with a Thickstun manifold and two 48 carbs. A Cannon 3/4 grind cam, and a reworked ignition that dad built himself. The car ran 108 M.P.H. at El Mirage. Dad was a meticulous builder, and the roadster was one of Burbank's finest," Richard told Kustomrama. As far as Richard knows, his dad was not a member of a club, "he never mentioned it. He ran at the lakes with different cars, and if he had to have a club affiliate he probably used his cousin Jim Woods' number."[1]


Sold to Ottie Junkins

In 1942 Dick went off to war, "and my grandfather sold the car for some much-needed cash. Dad was okay with that and was happy to help his dad out of a tight spot. The car sold in Fresno, California to a man named Ottie Junkins, who was the projection operator at the Tower Theatre. Dad would talk about this car for the rest of his life. We were never able to locate it again."[1]


References



Promote your shop, show or business on Kustomrama - This ad space can also be bought to promote cars for sale or to hunt down rare parts you're looking for. Click here for more info...

 

Did you enjoy this article?

Kustomrama is an online encyclopedia dedicated to traditional hot rod and custom cars. Our mission is to protect, preserve and share traditional hot rod custom car history from all over the world.




Help us make this article better

If you have additional information, photos, feedback or corrections about Dick Noble's 1932 Ford, please get in touch with Kustomrama at: mail@kustomrama.com.


This Article Was Made Possible By:

SunTec Auto Glass - Auto Glass Services on Vintage and Classic Cars
Finding a replacement windshield, back or side glass can be a difficult task when restoring your vintage or custom classic car. It doesn't have to be though now with auto glass specialist companies like www.suntecautoglass.com. They can source OEM or OEM-equivalent glass for older makes/models; which will ensure a proper fit every time. Check them out for more details!

Do you want to see your company here? Click here for more info about how you can become a Kustomrama advertiser and supporter.


Personal tools
Please Help Kustomrama
facebook
Recommended reading