Bob Creasman's 1940 Ford

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An early version of Creasman's coupe appeared in Dan Post's Original Blue Book of Custom Restyling in 1944. This version featured 1941 Lincoln Continental bumpers. Photo courtesy of Kustomrama.
A photo of Creasman's coupe, taken outside of Barris's Custom Shop at 7674 Compton Avenue in Los Angeles in 1948, before the car received fadeaway fenders. Photo by Johnny Zaro, courtesy of Trend Books.
Another early photo of Creasman's coupe taken outside of Barris's Custom Shop at 7674 Compton Avenue in Los Angeles. Photo by Johnny Zaro, courtesy of Trend Books.
Bob's coupe was featured in Hop Up October 1953.
Bob's coupe as it appeared when it was featured in Hop Up October 1953. Photo by Alan Deveau, courtesy of Hop Up Magazine.
The body work on the coupe was done by Creasman in conjunction with the Brand Brothers Body Shop in Los Angeles. In the channeling, four inches had to be cut from the height of the hood, since the front fenders were kept in the same height and position. Photo by Alan Deveau, courtesy of Hop Up Magazine.
Bob fit the coupe with fadeaway fenders in 1948. These were built up from sheet body stock which was formed around inch wide steel strips, outlining the desired contour in the manner of a birdcage. The fadeaways were faired into the existing stock front and rear fenders without otherwise disturbing them. Bob told Alan Deveau of Hop Up Magazine that a number of people had asked him how he made a set of Jaguar XK-120 fenders fit the coupe. Photo by Alan Deveau, courtesy of Hop Up Magazine.
The taillights were removed and the holes were filled before Bob installed motorcycle type lights. Photo by Alan Deveau, courtesy of Hop Up Magazine.
When Bon's coupe was featured in Hop Up October 1953 it had been fit with a black upholstery by Bob Poe. Black Cohyde seats, pleated and rolled, black headliner and black rugs. Photo by Alan Deveau, courtesy of Hop Up Magazine.
In 1954 the coupe appeared in Hop Up January 1954, nominated as one of the cars in in the 1954 Custom Car Contest. Photo courtesy of eBay.
In 1994 the Creasman Coupe was featured in Don Montgomery's book Authentic Hot Rods. Photo courtesy of eBay.
The Creasman Coupe as it sat in 1997, before it was restored by Bruns Kustom City for Mark Drews. Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
Photo courtesy of Bruns Kustom City.
The Creasman Coupe at the 2006 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. Photo courtesy of eBay.
The Creasman Coupe as it sat after Mike Davis bought it. Photo by Mike Davis, courtesy of Born Loser.
Photo by Mike Davis, courtesy of Born Loser.
Photo by Mike Davis, courtesy of Born Loser.
Photo by Mike Davis, courtesy of Born Loser.
The Creasman Coupe at the 2015 Grand National Roadster Show. Photo courtesy of eBay.
Photo courtesy of eBay.
Photo courtesy of eBay.

1940 Ford coupe owned by Bob Creasman of Los Angeles, California. Bob bought the Ford in 1943. Ten years later, it was featured in Hop Up October 1953. According to the featured story in Hop Up, Creasman began restyling the car late in 1943, making it the first 1940 Ford coupe to be channeled, and the second to be chopped in the Los Angeles area. The body work was done by Creasman in conjunction with the Brand Brothers Body Shop in Los Angeles. Four inches were removed from the top, before the body was channeled another four inches around the frame. During the chop, it was necessary to extend the length of the top four inches with a section of body steel in order to make the sloping windshield posts and the rear windows areas meet the top. The rear quarter windows were then blanked in with sheet stock and the seams filled and smoothed. In the channeling, four inches had to be cut from the height of the hood, since the front fenders were kept in the same height and position. The rear fenders were left attached and dropped with the body, and the running boards were removed. The seat was bolted directly to the floor, in order to provide head and leg room after the chop and channeling. A crease was made atop the sectioned hood, replacing the original chrome strip. In the rear of the car, the taillights were removed and the holes were filled, before Bob installed motorcycle type lights. The door handles were shaved, and replaced with toe operated opening levers, placed underneath the doors. An inside opener operated the deck lid. The gas filler was moved inside the trunk. A Jet Black paint job wrapped up the exterior modifications. As the body was channeled, the suspension on the car was left untouched. It was powered by a 1942 Mercury engine that had been bored to 3 3/8". The engine was also stroked 1/4". Speed equipment included a Winfield Super R-1 camshaft, Edelbrock heads and manifold, block ported, polished and relieved. All parts were also balanced.[1]


In 1944 an early version of Bob's coupe appeared in Dan Post's Original Blue Book of Custom Restyling. This version featured 1941 Lincoln Continental bumpers.


Fadeaway Fenders

Bob fit the coupe with fadeaway fenders in 1948. These were built up from sheet body stock which was formed around inch wide steel strips, outlining the desired contour in the manner of a birdcage. The fadeaways were faired into the existing stock front and rear fenders without otherwise disturbing them. Bob told Alan Deveau of Hop Up Magazine that a number of people had asked him how he made a set of Jaguar XK-120 fenders fit the coupe.[1]


In 1949 the car turned 105 mph at a dry lakes event, running a stock rear end gear ratio with 6.50-15 tires on the rear and 5.00-15 in front.[1]


Hop Up October 1953

In 1953, when the car was featured in Hop Up October 1953, Bob was employed at the Brand Brothers Body Shop, and he told Alan Deveau that it would take approximately $1500 in metal work and upholstery to duplicate the car ten years later. Shortly before car was photographed for the story, it had been fit with a black upholstery by Bob Poe. Black Cohyde seats, pleated and rolled, black headliner and black rugs. The interior did also feature chromed window moldings and chrome trimmed dash. The 1953 version sported 1946 Ford bumpers.[1]


Mark Drews

Mark Drews of Seal Beach, California found the car covered in dust in a garage in San Fernando Valley in 1996. He began researching the history of the car, and found it featured in Hop Up October 1953. After uncovering the history of the car, he bought it, and delivered it to Jim Bruns and his crew at Bruns Kustom City for a restoration. The restoration was started in 1997, and Mark told Jim to restore the car to it's former glory, without changing any of the original modifications. The restored version was fit with a stroked 1948 Ford flathead engine that featured high-compression pistons and an Isky cam. The nose of the car was lowered by installing a 4-inch dropped axle. Once the panels were straightened, the car was painted in a 1998 Cadillac Cranberry Metallic color. The interior was upholstered in maroon and pearl white tuck 'n' roll. Total restoration time was one year, and it was completed in 1999.[2]


Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance

ın 2006 the coupe was invited to the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance.[3]


Mike Davis

In 2014 Mark Drews sold the car to Mike Davis. After Mike bought it, the car went through an extensive mechanical overhaul at Circle City Hotrods. In 2015 it was shown at the Grand National Roadster Show as part of the 75th anniversary of the 1940 Ford exhibit. In February of 2015, Mike advertised the car for sale on eBay. The listing was ended early, before any bids were entered, and Mike sold the car in March.[3]


Magazine Features and Appearances

Hop Up October 1953
Hop Up January 1954
Trend Book 208 Custom Cars 2012 Annual


References





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