Tommy Jamieson's 1941 Lincoln

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Tommy's Lincoln at a parade in 1949.[1]
Tommy's old Lincoln in primer next to Jack Stewart's 1950 Oldsmobile outside Valley Custom. This photo was taken around 1952, after Bob Snyder had bought it and brought it back to Valley Custom for further modifications.
Tommy-Jamieson-1941-Lincoln-6.jpg
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Tommy's old Lincoln as it sat in 2007. Photo from Lucky B Design.
Photo from Lucky B Design
Photo from Lucky B Design
Photo from Lucky B Design
Photo from Lucky B Design

1941 Lincoln Continental owned by Tommy Jamieson of Burbank, California. Tommy purchased the car shortly after the second world war. Being a custom car enthusiast, he began to do some bodywork of his own on the car, smoothing out a couple of rough spots on the body, removing the hood ornament and giving it a new paint job. He later commissioned Fred Glass and Howard Fall to some more bodywork. By the time they were done, it had recieved a completely new grille made out of chrome steel tubings. The crown on the front fenders had been raised three inches, making the hood look lower. The headlights were extended and the rear fenders had been replaced by 1946 Lincoln units. 1947 Packard Clipper bumpers were added both front and rear. Once completed, it was painted jet black lacquer. He then had Carson Top Shop to fabricate a padded top, the windshield was left unchopped. It turned out the black lacquer which had been applied was of the bad kind and was beginning to deteriorate. A new Cadillac Cimmaron green paint job was then applied.


Tommy felt the car was missing something, so he brought it down to Valley Custom in Burbank to get it even further customized. At valley Custom]] they lowered the spare tire mount so the tire would not stick above the trunk compartment. A gravel shield was built between the body and the rear bumper and the doors and trunk were operated by solenoids. The car was lowered by adding a dropped axle, and both the front and rear springs were reworked to bring the Lincoln further down to the ground. The 1946 Lincoln rear fenders were several inches wider than the stock fenders, which made the wheels look to far under the car. Special wheels that placed the tire and rim further out on the wheel centers were made, making the rear tread three inch wider. Tommy also had the engine rebuilt, almost stock except for a dual intake manifold which was added to give the car better acceleration. As Tommy was bitten by the "new car bug", he sold it to Bob Snyder of Burbank, California.


Bob brought it back to Valley Custom again for some minor modifications. The stock Lincoln taillights were replaced by 1950 Buick units. The rear seat was moved moved eight inches back in order to get more space for the passengers. The seat was widened out into the folding mechanism were the top sat before. The seats and door panels were re-upholstered by Card Pierson, and the Carson Top was freshed up. Valley Custom re-painted the car in Cimmaron green once again. As Bob was not satisfied with the stock engine, he milled the heads, chopped the flywheel and installed a Winfield cam. [2]


The car is currently still around, and photos posted on the Lucky B Design Blog shows it as it sat in 2007 rusting away in a backyard.


Magazine Features

Trend Book 101 Custom Cars
Hop Up October 1953
Rod Action September 1975


References

  1. Rik Hoving Custom Photo Archive
  2. Hop Up October 1953





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