Fadeaway Fenders

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Butler Rugard's 1940 Mercury convertible of Sacramento, California. Butler bought the car brand new in 1940. He had owned several customized cars before, and wanted the Merc to be restyled as well. The work was done by Harry Westergard, and it is believed that Butler intially just wanted a set of fadeaway fenders.
Richard Meade's 1938 Buick convertible was restyled in 1941, featuring fadeaway fenders.
Lawrence Garrison's 1940 Mercury Convertible of Massachusetts. It is believed that the build was completed around 1947, featuring fadeaway fenders.
George Barris' 1941 Buick convertible of Los Angeles, California. The build was completed late in 1947, featuring fadeaway fenders.
Raymond Jones' 1947 Studebaker Convertible of Dallas, Pennsylvania was restyled around 1947.
Bruce Brown's 1936 Ford of San Mateo, California. Bruce's Ford was restyled in the 1940s, sometime prior to 1948. It featured full fadeaway fenders.
Bob Creasman's 1940 Ford coupe of Los Angeles, California. Bob began restyling the car late in 1943, making it the first 1940 Ford coupe to be channeled, and the second to be chopped in the Los Angeles area. The work was done in conjunction with the Brand Brothers Body Shop in Los Angeles. In 1948 the car received fadeaway fenders.
Al Lauer's 1941 Cadillac Convertible of Sacramento, California. Restyled by Harry Westergard, the build was completed in 1948, featuring fadeaway fenders.
John Vara's 1941 Ford Convertible was restyled by Barris Kustoms in 1948, featuring fadeaway fenders. John sold the car to Johnny Zaro of Maywood, California before the build was completed.
Charles Kemp's 1941 Plymouth Convertible. Restyled by Al Twitchell, the build was completed in July of 1948, featuring fadeaway fenders.
A Jimmy Summers Fender Extensions ad from 1948
Gil Ayala's 1940 Mercury. The build was completed New Years Day 1949.
C. E. Johnson's 1939 Ford, of California was restyled in the late 1940s.
Var Martin's 1941 Buick. Var's Buick was completed in the late 1940s.
Bill DeCarr's 1941 Mercury. Restyled by Barris Kustoms, the build was completed in the late 1940s.
Butler Rugard's 1947 Chevrolet of Sacramento, California. Restyled by Harry Westergard, the build was completed in the late 1940s, featuring Jimmy Summers fadeaway fenders.
Joe Urritta's 1941 Ford of Fresno, California. Restyled by Barris Kustoms, the build was completed in 1950, featuring fadeaway fenders.
Jack Stewart's 1941 Ford of Los Angeles, California. Restyled by Kenny Lucas, Gil's Auto Body Works and Barris Kustoms, the build was completed in 1951, featuring fadeaway fenders.
Hank Griffith's 1942 Ford of Pasadena, California. The build was completed in 1951, featuring fadeaway fenders.
Sam Barris' 1949 Mercury. Built around 1950/1951, the car featured fadeaway fenders.
Louie Bettancourt's 1949 Mercury. Restyled by Gil's Auto Body Works, the build was completed in 1952, featuring fadeaway fenders.
Buddy Alcorn's 1950 Mercury was restyled by Gil's Auto Body Works for an unknown owner. The build was completed in 1952, featuring fadeaway fenders.
Frank Monteleon's 1941 Ford. The build was completed in 1955, featuring fadeaway fenders.
Art Lehner's 1939 Ford ,the Fadeaway Ford. The build was completed sometime between 1956 and 1958, featuring fadeaway fenders.

Fadeaway fenders was a popular kustom treatment in the 1940s. George Barris meant that giving a car fadeaway fenders sat it apart and stamped it as a kustom. It gave the car a new look with a smooth, rounded bodyline. Both Sam and George Barris liked fadeaway fenders, and the fadeaway fender became one of their trademarks. The Ayalas were also into fadeaway fenders in the forties. One of the first know fadeaway fendered custom cars is Butler Rugard's 1940 Mercury. The car was restyled by Harry Westergard in 1940. Harry did also fabricate the fadeaway fenders. Where Butler and Harry got the idea of fadeaway fenders from are unknown. The first production cars to feature fadeaway fenders were the 1942 Buick Roadmasters and Supers. One year earlier, in 1941, the 1941 Chrysler Newport Concept Car was shown to the public. The Newport was fitted with fadeaway fenders.


Contents

Summers Fender Extension

In 1946 Jimmy Summers started offering fadeaway fender kits for 1942-1948 Chevrolets, Pontiacs and junior Buicks. Spencer Murray bought a set from Jimmy to put on his 1946 Chevrolet fastback, and he remembers that Jimmy had dies made to stamp the parts and a sheet metal shop to do the stamping.[1] In 1948, Jimmy ran ads for his "Summer Fender Extensions" in Hot Rod Magazine. At the time Jimmy had a shop at 7919 Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles. According to the ads he ran, the fender panels served to enhance the body lines and inexpensively repair damaged or rusted doors and bodies. Fender extensions for Chevrolets, 1942 through 1948, were made in two types. "Type A" fit Aero Sedans, and "Type B" fit Convertibles, Coupes and Tudor Sedans. A complete primered set came with brackets, nuts, bolts, patterns and instructions for installation. The list price was $69.50.[2]


Custom Cars Featuring Fadeaway Fenders

Bruce Brown's 1936 Ford
Richard Meade's 1938 Buick Convertible
Art Lehner's 1939 Ford
C. E. Johnson's 1939 Ford
Bob Creasman's 1940 Ford Coupe
Butler Rugard's 1940 Mercury
Gil Ayala's 1940 Mercury
Lawrence Garrison's 1940 Mercury Convertible
George Barris' 1941 Buick
Var Martin's 1941 Buick
Al Lauer's 1941 Cadillac Convertible
Frank Monteleone's 1941 Ford
Jack Stewart's 1941 Ford
Joe Urritta's 1941 Ford
John Vara's 1941 Ford Convertible
Charles Kemp's 1941 Plymouth Convertible
Hank Griffith's 1942 Ford
Bill DeCarr's 1941 Mercury
Ben Mario's 1947 Buick
Butler Rugard's 1947 Chevrolet
Raymond Jones' 1947 Studebaker Convertible
Louie Bettancourt's 1949 Mercury
Sam Barris' 1949 Mercury
Buddy Alcorn's 1950 Mercury


References

  1. Spencer Murray
  2. Hot Rod Magazine November 1948


Sources

Rodders Journal Number Twenty Nine
Barris Kustom Techniques of the '50s






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